Art in the Library

1st Floor
Matthew Hoffman

Quotations


Artist: Matthew Hoffman
In the trees throughout the Children's department on the 1st floor

From the artist:

Matthew Hoffman, based in Chicago, worked closely with Sharon & Peter Exley from ArchitectureIsFun to create a variety of panels and pieces throughout the library.

The panels were all treated individually. Each piece was hand drawn by Hoffman and scanned in, inspired by the idea that a different child/person had worked on each one. The works varied from custom printed fabrics and hand embroidery, to cut woods and custom built metal chain drapes.

Many of the panels were embroidered, a powerful example of this is "You must do something to make the world more beautiful" located in the Creativity Park. Some of the panels were custom printed fabric, as seen with "Imagine" translated into multiple languages to set the tone of inspiration in the Welcome Park. A select group of pieces were cut out of wood and plastic. The phrase, "I like adventures, and I'm going to find one" in the Story Park accentuates the wonderful storytelling area.

His works include a special project as a powerful dedication in honor of a young boy, Jack Noble. Hoffman used the stars in the sky to spell out the phrase "I love you right up to the moon and back".

Michael Ireland

Breaking Through


Artist: Michael Ireland
In between Meeting Rooms A and B on the 1st floor

From the artist:

"I was asked to create this piece with the idea it would reflect on the surrounding landscape and the prairie lands that symbolize the heartland. A piece that I had completed earlier was a reference for this but I was asked to bring more vitality and a vision of growth. I switched my palette around to bring in some more verdant greens and blues with the cadmium yellow and yellow ochre breaking through the background to give it a burst of energy and sunlight."

Michael Ireland has participated in the creative process for over thirty-five years beginning with his studies at the American Academy of Art in Chicago. Under the direction of master instructor Irving Shapiro, he began to explore the effects of light and color through transparent watercolor. He soon developed a passion for the medium that continued throughout his life and career. Today Michael is a nationally recognized painter as well as an accomplished creative director and graphic designer.

Michael's painting style and technique challenges the scale and format associated with traditional transparent watercolor resulting in some of his recent works measuring up to over twenty feet in length. This process and approach has led to his artwork being placed in healthcare, corporate and residential collections throughout the country.

He was also the founder and creative leader of an award winning design firm specializing in film/video, graphic design and multi-media. His clients included Gatorade, Accenture, Baxter Healthcare, KPMG, Quaker Oats and Zenith to name a few. Leaving the world of commercial art in 2001, he made the commitment to turn his lifelong passion into his lifelong career. Michael is now focused solely on his career as a fine artist.

Natalie Blake

Tree of Life


Artist: Natalie Blake
Next to Materials on Hold on the 1st Floor

From the artist:

"The Tree of Life inspires me. It is a universal symbol found in many spiritual traditions; it is a symbol of healing, growth and regeneration. Tall and strong, it has deep roots. It reaches skyward. It loses its leaves and grows new ones; it gives shelter. With nurture and care, it lives for generations. A tree also bears seeds or fruits, which contain the essence of the tree, and this continuous regeneration is a potent symbol of immortality.

Our tiles are made by draping squares of clay over simple shapes to create undulation in each tile. Tiles are then carved using the ancient Italian technique of sgraffito, which means "to scratch". When laid next to each other, the tiles form contiguous or abstract designs that can be expanded to any size. The high-fired, durable, sun- and weather-resistant tile can be grouted into a permanent installation or hung as a tile mural. The modular format of the tiles can be adapted to suit architectural niches, angles, large or small spaces, curved walls, and indoor or outdoor applications. These decorative tiles are ideal for fireplace surrounds, kitchen backsplashes, bath tile, and wall art."

Spring Thaw


Artist: Cheryl Holz
Next to Brook's Cafe on the 1st Floor

From the artist:

"A longing for spring was motivation for this piece. A river is poured over charts of Illinois waterways, carrying tadpoles down the stream. A snapper turtle (printed from a rubber replica) darts off into the corner; a spring peeper fades into the background, and the silhouette of a salamander works its way through the green. Ferns bend to and fro under constellations from the North sky."

Cheryl Holz grew up in the country, collecting moss, bugs, leaves, and to her mother's chagrin, snakes and salamanders. Her rural upbringing had a big influence on her aesthetic sensibility, and most of her work today is a homage to nature's strength, beauty and diversity. She has an undergraduate degree in art education, studied drawing and painting at California State at Northridge, and received her Master of Fine Arts in crafts from Northern Illinois University in 1995. Cheryl's background in art education landed her a spot with the Illinois Arts Council's Artists Roster for Arts-in-Education, but as her career expanded, she phased out teaching and now makes art full time.

Cheryl has received local and national recognition for her work, and shows in galleries, museums and juried shows throughout the country. Her work is included in many corporate collections and hospitals. She is represented by international print publisher Winn Devon, and was nominated for the Independent Film Record Label Association's CD cover of the year. She has completed 8 residencies at the Ragdale Foundation and I-Park, and has received numerous arts in education grants from the Illinois Arts Council.

When she's not working in her studio overlooking the Fox River she enjoys tramping around the local forest preserves with her dogs in tow.

Julie Collins

Milkweed


Artist: Julie Collins
In between Meeting Rooms A and B on the 1st Floor

Giclee on canvas

"I started scanning flora from my garden in 2006. I have become an obsessive gardener over the past several years and had been photographing my garden since obtaining my first digital camera in 2000. After attempting my first scan in June, 2006, I was hooked on the process and the possibilities to create visually appealing images while documenting the variety and beauty of what I grow, mostly from seed, in my backyard.

I studied art at the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign after finishing my master's degree in Library Science. As a non-degree student, I was able to take fundamental courses in painting, drawing and printmaking. I spent three years in American Samoa where I was immersed in the teaching and making of art. Alot of my design sensibilities were developed in Samoa from observing and copying the traditional designs used to create Siapo or tapa cloths. These traditional design elements are based on flora indigenous to the islands."

2nd Floor
Linda Leviton

Ribbons


Artist: Linda Leviton
At the top of the stairs, across from the 2nd Floor Information Desk

From the artist:

"I often feel that whatever an artist creates cannot equal what nature displays. But I can select elements to communicate my vision. Nature is in my palette and is an endless source of pattern, texture, and form. It inspires me. Whether I am looking at crushed stone on a mountain side or the trails of insect infestation in rotting wood, I am fascinated by it. The varieties of texture, scale, color and form are everywhere. Whether looking at a macro or micro level, patterns repeat in fresh formations.

I make symbolic landscapes because there are other ways to look at a landscape than recreating a snapshot of a particular vantage point. The work shown is from an evolving series called "Patterns of Nature." Whether reflecting planar surfaces of rock or the curve of flowing water, these varied modules come together to make landscapes of elements, weather patterns and flora in a sequence like a story of the world that I want to see.

While my everyday landscape is filled with shopping centers, traffic, and housing developments, I choose to have my personal landscape filled with the details that get overlooked in everyday life. The pieces are poems that I have written to those who view my work. Making art makes me feel liberated from work. I think about what I am going to make, how to make it, how to vary it, what kind of new materials or tools I can learn about and use all the time. I have worked in wood, metal, plastic, wire, fabric, and found objects; and I have painted, patinated, welded, routed, laser cut, veneered, formed, hammered, heat formed, riveted etc. I just love my work and think I would shrivel up and die if I could not make art. It is the air I breathe.

I started my art business in 1993. I have exhibited internationally and sold work that is in collections around the world. In 2008, I built a 2400 sq ft. studio in Lewis Center which allows me to create even larger work. I am currently working on a commission for Michigan State University's National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory in East Lansing Michigan which is a 21 ft. wall sculpture that captures the idea of what happens conceptually inside a cyclotron."

Marsh Scott

Bridge to Imagination


Artist: Marsh Scott
Next to Administration Offices, across from the Board Room on the 2nd Floor

From the artist:

"Bridge to Imagination" began with sketches of trees, a stream, and bridge from Marsh's photography. The designs were simplified and re-drawn in CAD so that the design could be laser cut in stainless steel. Mounting hardware was welded to the back and then the brushed texture was ground into the surface. After waxing, the completed sculpture was ready to be crated and shipped.

Marsh says, "From the time I was a little girl, libraries were places of wonder and discovery. My grandfather was in charge of the libraries of Case Western Reserve University and I can remember being taken there as a little girl, following my grand-father around through the massive stacks of books and thinking how special it was to visit them. When visiting, I stayed in his home library and loved to read and look at all the books he had collected. I wanted this artwork to convey this sense of wonder, discovery, and the unlimited world of the imagination."

Working in metal, encaustics, oils, stone, and photography, Marsh Scott creates both abstractions and figurative artworks. Images are inspired by her photography, each individual location, and the individuals that will be experiencing the artwork.

Marsh began her work in multiple mediums while receiving a BS at Penn State in art education. Her specialization in ceramics, fiber and jewelry was the beginning of her love of surface, texture and process. A Masters in Art at Cal State Long Beach added research in ethnic crafts and their patterns and textures. Architecture classes at the University of California at Irvine became the starting point for her ordered spatial and 2D design organization.

Marsh lives and works in Laguna Beach, California. In 2010 she received the "Artist of the Year" award in Laguna Beach.

Michael Dubina

Ninas Twilight Oil on Canvas


Artist: Michael Dubina
Next to the Administration Offices, across from the Board Room on the 2nd Floor

From the artist:

"I dedicate this oil painting "Nina's Twilight" in honor of my Mother Nina Dubina who is currently battling cancer.

Sometimes I think of my paintings in terms of theatre, where a dramatic story is unfolding on stage before an audience. Low horizon lines allow for the description of dominant skies while creating a sense of expansiveness in my work. Through the use of glazes I achieve a glowing ambient light that subtly graduates to darkness. All objects, trees, and buildings are illuminated from behind, enhancing the drama. The lone tree and the weathered tree are important, often repeated motifs symbolizing the struggle of the individual and of overcoming adversity.

My oil paintings are done on a beveled canvas that lifts the central picture plane three inches off the wall. This element gives the painting a certain physical presence, turning it into an object that extends into space, physically engaging the viewer. The beveled edges are darkened so that the luminosity of the sky emanates from the center of the painting. I believe this adds to the spiritual quality of light that plays a central role in my work. Through these contrasts I hope to make my viewers aware of and contemplate the triumphs and struggles that may exist in their own lives suggesting a higher power at work. The vitality of a painting in my mind rests not in its ability to answer questions, but rather to provoke them."

Michael Hoffman

The Vortex


Artist: Michael Hoffman
Outside the Vortex, near the Audio Visual Collection on the 2nd floor

From the artist:

Matthew Hoffman, based in Chicago, worked closely with Sharon & Peter Exley from ArchitectureIsFun to create a variety of panels and pieces throughout the library.

The Vortex sign was made of cast off pieces from his studio. The piece is left raw and unfinished, matching with the urban feel of the skateboards in the Teen Area. Also in the teen area, Hoffman came up with "Think Epic" to be grandly displayed as a chain drape covering the windows.

Jim Zwadlo

Untitled


Artist: Jim Zwadlo
Near the Vortex, behind the Audiobooks on CD on the 2nd floor

From the artist:

"I grew up on a dairy farm in northern Wisconsin helping my family feed about 50 cows. I started my undergraduate degree at UW-Madison, and finished at SUNY-Potsdam, in upstate New York, with a BFA in Fine Arts. I lived in New York City and its environs for about 20 years, and now live on the South Side of Milwaukee.

I paint the urban pedestrian from the aerial point of view.

This imagery and point of view originated with working in New York office buildings, looking out the window, and thinking about where I am, where everyone else is, and then thinking about how to paint the answers to those questions. For me, the flatness of the Wisconsin landscape, and of the Midwest in general, translates directly into two-dimensions, like a map (or a painting). New York City is the opposite, being totally vertical. I found that looking out windows in skyscrapers was just like looking at a map (or a painting), and I found myself translating the visual appearance of New York into a spatial version of Wisconsin.

I see painting as an ideal map of the world. I paint what I see on the street as if it were already a map, or even already a painting, such as the painted crosswalks. The people too are part of my ideal map of the world. Although left out of the usual maps, to me people belong in a map of the city as much as the streets and buildings. My painting is about finding a way to put the people back in the picture, along with the abstract signs and symbols we use as guides.

However, all the theorizing about painting is really a means to another end. My real purpose in developing these ideas is to find new ways of seeing, and to inspire you, as viewer, to see that it is possible for each of us to find our own way of seeing, equally valid, interesting, and constantly changing."

From the artist:

“I grew up on a dairy farm in northern Wisconsin helping my family feed about 50 cows. I started my undergraduate degree at UW-Madison, and finished at SUNY-Potsdam, in upstate New York, with a BFA in Fine Arts. I lived in New York City and its environs for about 20 years, and now live on the South Side of Milwaukee.

I paint the urban pedestrian from the aerial point of view.

This imagery and point of view originated with working in New York office buildings, looking out the window, and thinking about where I am, where everyone else is, and then thinking about how to paint the answers to those questions. For me, the flatness of the Wisconsin landscape, and of the Midwest in general, translates directly into two-dimensions, like a map (or a painting). New York City is the opposite, being totally vertical. I found that looking out windows in skyscrapers was just like looking at a map (or a painting), and I found myself translating the visual appearance of New York into a spatial version of Wisconsin.

I see painting as an ideal map of the world. I paint what I see on the street as if it were already a map, or even already a painting, such as the painted crosswalks. The people too are part of my ideal map of the world. Although left out of the usual maps, to me people belong in a map of the city as much as the streets and buildings. My painting is about finding a way to put the people back in the picture, along with the abstract signs and symbols we use as guides.

However, all the theorizing about painting is really a means to another end. My real purpose in developing these ideas is to find new ways of seeing, and to inspire you, as viewer, to see that it is possible for each of us to find our own way of seeing, equally valid, interesting, and constantly changing.”

- See more at: http://www.fountaindale.org/about-the-library/art-walk/432-untitled-by-j...

Jock Cooper

Untitled


Artist: Jock Cooper
On the wall, far side of the Computer Commons on the 2nd Floor

Fractal images can be generated by anyone with the software, just as someone with a pencil can draw. California artist Jock Cooper is to Fractals as MC Escher is to drawing. From the onset of personal computing, Jock combined his love of math with his passion for computers. Early in the 80's he saw a primitive fractal generating device, so when the first fractal software became available he bought it. Jock Cooper is a modern master at converting math into art.

From the artist:

"In making fractal art the elements are presented in an infinite amount of detail, mostly spiral forms. I create my images by combining these twisting, small elements with large structures, and light with shadow. I envision them to be portraits or landscapes with dynamic forms of light and focused energy, the same as any traditional artist would.

Mathematical equations aren't normally thought of as beautiful, but when you begin to turn the equations back on themselves, they become a fractal, and complex, unexpected shapes emerge. I feel like I'm painting these scenes, but my paints are mathematical algorithms.

Making fractal art intrigues me because the rudimentary mathematical artifacts are crude constructs, and I rearrange them into mathematical artistry. It's my passion, but that's a feeling shared by anyone who is driven to create."

2nd Floor, 3rd Floor
Markian Olynyk

A Place to Grow


Artist: Markian Olynyk
Can be seen by the windows in the Computer Commons on the 2nd Floor or the 3rd Floor balcony near the Adult New Books section

From the artist:

Design inspiration:

  • 4 seasons (from bottom: spring, summer, autumn, winter)
  • 3 sections of the Dupage River ) from the Forest Preserve to Pilcher Rd)
  • Trees: Blue Ash and White Oak
  • Bolingbrook flag
  • "A Place to Grow"...written 3 ways (child's chalkboard, Braille, binary code)
  • Original Village Hall
  • Route 53, I-55, I-355Village of Bolingbrook (represented by 1" square bevels)
  • Westbury Subdivision
  • Clow Airport
  • Hidden Lakes
  • State of Illinois and Lake MichiganSports: soccer, baseball, football, basketball, golf, cricket and hockey
  • State symbols: cardinal, bluegill, monarch butterfly, white-tailed deer, violets, big bluestem grass
  • Oak leaves / acorns
  • Tree rings
  • 5 "inspiration" words

Markian Olynyk

A Place to Grow


Artist: Markian Olynyk
Can be seen by the windows in the Computer Commons on the 2nd Floor or the 3rd Floor balcony near the Adult New Books section

From the artist:

Design inspiration:

  • 4 seasons (from bottom: spring, summer, autumn, winter)
  • 3 sections of the Dupage River ) from the Forest Preserve to Pilcher Rd)
  • Trees: Blue Ash and White Oak
  • Bolingbrook flag
  • "A Place to Grow"...written 3 ways (child's chalkboard, Braille, binary code)
  • Original Village Hall
  • Route 53, I-55, I-355Village of Bolingbrook (represented by 1" square bevels)
  • Westbury Subdivision
  • Clow Airport
  • Hidden Lakes
  • State of Illinois and Lake MichiganSports: soccer, baseball, football, basketball, golf, cricket and hockey
  • State symbols: cardinal, bluegill, monarch butterfly, white-tailed deer, violets, big bluestem grass
  • Oak leaves / acorns
  • Tree rings
  • 5 "inspiration" words

3rd Floor
Marianne Albers-McKoveck

Wildernest


Artist: Marianne Albers-McKoveck
Halfway down to the Local History Room, next to the staff entrance on the 3rd Floor

Acrylic

From the artist:

"I am an artist, living and working in Palatine, Illinois. I work mainly with acrylic on canvas. Most of my paintings are large, but the piece that I did for the library was the biggest that I had done up to that point. I use a very heavy canvas and scrub layers upon layers of color to get a "soft" effect. I work mostly from photographs, many taken while traveling."

For Marianne Albers McKoveck, art has always been an important extension of her world. Her philosophy is that art can be found in every aspect of life. Art can be demonstrated by such things as creating a warm and joyful home, preparing a gourmet meal to be shared with friends, or by nurturing an ever-changing flower garden. Marianne believes that if her actions are graceful and inspired by love, then art, in its purest form, is created.

Marianne states, "I want my work to be open to interpretation. I start the dialogue, but let the viewers create their own story. I want them to have some fun speculating on what the painting is trying to say. By changing the perspective and the angles, I put the subject on a different plane. This adds energy, and excitement. I want my paintings to tell a story".

Marianne's paintings have been in many national and regional shows. She has won numerous awards including "Best in Show" in this year's 18th Annual Best of the Best, sponsored by the Alliance of Fine Art. One of her paintings was chosen for the cover of the financial statement of Marco Island, Florida, another for a page in a calendar for the Northern Illinois Food Bank. Some of her commission work includes the Tasty Catering in Elk Grove Village, Illinois and a portrait of Tekakwitha which the Knight's of Columbus use on a banner for their parades.

Indai Cruse-Griffin

Community Together


Artist: India Cruse-Griffin
Next to the Business Center, near the Quiet Reading Room on the 3rd Floor

From the artist:

"What I create in my paintings is my personal truth.

When I paint what is in my soul, I believe in it. My soul embraces it from my own reality. Life forces me to be honest with my art and to find that unique balance of what I know to be true. Painting secures my knowledge of my truth. It is at that point and that point alone when I maintain balance within my world. Seeing the truth in my inner self. Everything just fails into place.

Community Together is about a neighborhood bound by pride, family, friends and common ground. Growing up in a small town in Indiana, this artwork represents my homestead, my heart, my family. I remember lots of neighbors surrounding our home, a neighborhood of fences, pulled together by houses and people enjoying life. Normally fences are to keep people out or kids in, but not in my neighborhood. The fence was a sense of home, something that said, Yes this is mine and my family worked hard for it.

My neighborhood was a family, a proud people, who cared and looked after one other. I remember my mother and her friends hanging around the fence talking about the matters of the day, while we children played, running in and out, the breeze blowing and the trees swaying, a simple but blessed life. In my art A Community Together, I show an updated version of my feelings of the past. Children playing, celebrations happening, pond full of life. It is my hope that when you view my work that you find yourself in it and you get that sense of community, feeling, and a family full of friendship and pride."